Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Naval Brass: Key Properties That Make it Fit for Marine Environments

A copper alloy, brass is produced by melting copper and combining it with zinc ores. The resulting alloy is harder and stronger than copper, its primary material, yet still malleable enough to be shaped into different products. Brass also has good heat conductivity and is highly recyclable, properties that help ensure brass sales will continue to grow for years to come. Brass for Marine Applications In the naval industry, brass is valued for its unmatched resistance to seawater corrosion. To suit marine environments, small amounts of other elements are added to brass to boost its performance, mostly for better corrosion resistance and durability. Higher zinc content, for instance, increases the alloy’s strength, while tin and arsenic improve its resistance against dezincification, a normal corrosive reaction in seawater.

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